DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science

FROM THE DEMATTEIS SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE DEAN'S DESK

It is my privilege to serve as dean of the Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science. Primarily an undergraduate school committed to educating future generations of engineers and computer scientists, we also offer Master of Science degrees in Cybersecurity, Computer Science, and Engineering Management. These advanced degrees complement our 14 undergraduate degrees available through the Department of Engineering and the Department of Computer Science.

The DeMatteis School currently serves approximately 785 students pursuing bachelor's degrees and 60 pursuing master’s degrees. The rapid and sustained growth we have experienced over the past seven years is the result of a great demand for graduates who have the skills and knowledge required to work in the technical sector and to contribute immediately to a company's mission in the marketplace. To assist in meeting that demand, our Co-op Program, which was established at the beginning of 2015, has already enlisted approximately 200 companies as partners in hiring interested juniors or seniors for six- to eight-month full-time work experiences prior to graduation.

Our commitment to students and our partnerships with the community extend even further. Our Center for Innovation allows faculty and students to provide technical and engineering expertise to regional businesses and research centers, thereby supporting the region's research-based economy and providing students with valuable real-world experience. Another exciting opportunity awaiting motivated students is our Advanced Summer Program in Research (ASPiRe). This program offers competitive stipends for students who wish to go beyond the academic requirements of their degree programs to experience advanced scientific research within a variety of disciplines. This past year, approximately 60% of our full-time faculty spent the summer months mentoring students on work that typically leads to published papers at scientific conferences or in journals, and which serves as excellent preparation for those who want to pursue graduate studies at prestigious research institutions.

These and other ventures, such as Hofstra in Silicon Valley and DeMatteis OverSEAS, are possible through the hiring and retention of faculty who are passionate about their fields, and who are committed to mentoring students into well-rounded, creative problem solvers who are prepared to help humanity tackle and overcome the challenges of today's complex technological environment.

I am proud to be a part of this exceptional community of scholars, and I strongly encourage students looking toward a career in engineering or computer science to consider a future with us at the DeMatteis School.

Sina Y. Rabbany, Ph.D.
Dean, Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science
Jean Nerken Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Founding Director of the Bioengineering Program

Engineering Dean

Dr. Sina Rabbany
Dean
Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science

Dr. Sina Y. Rabbany was appointed the dean of the Hofstra University’s Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science, effective June 7, 2016. He is the Jean Nerken Distinguished Professor of Engineering and the founding director of the Bioengineering Program. | more |


Dr. Sina Rabbany
Dean
Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Dr. Sina Y. Rabbany was appointed the dean of the Hofstra University's Fred DeMatteis School of Engineering and Applied Science, effective June 7, 2016. He is the Jean Nerken Distinguished Professor of Engineering and the founding director of the Bioengineering Program. He joined Hofstra in 1990 as an assistant professor of engineering to create the Hofstra Bioengineering Program, the first on Long Island. He was appointed associate professor in 1993, and promoted to professor of engineering in 1998.

Dr. Rabbany is currently doing research in the field of cellular and tissue engineering as applied to the vascular system. His primary focus is to investigate the impact of the biophysical microenvironment on the structure and function of endothelial cells – the cells that make up the structure of blood vessels. These cells are exposed to various physiological cues in vitro and interrogated with atomic force microscopy to map out changes in their material properties. This work addresses one of the major obstacles in engineering organs, the generation of functional vascular networks.

Dr. Rabbany and colleagues from Weill Cornell Medical College recently developed a technology to generate vascular constructs by utilizing scaffolds to promote 3-D structures of blood vessels to restore damaged or diseased organs. This could someday diminish the need for donated organs and transplants.

The author of more than 60 publications and patents in the areas of cardiovascular dynamics, biosensors, vascular biology and tissue engineering/regenerative medicine, Dr. Rabbany has received funding from numerous organizations, including the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Office of Naval Research. He received the Young Investigators Award from the Cardiovascular Systems Dynamics Society in 1992, the Achievement Award presented by the Engineers Joint Committee of Long Island in 2003, and the Athanasios Papoulis Award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 2009, and was selected to be a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical & Biological Engineering in 2012.

In addition to his work at Hofstra, Dr. Rabbany is an adjunct associate professor of bioengineering in medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. He completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania.